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Lori Loughlin Sentenced to Two Months in Prison for Her Involvement in the Admissions Scandal

Shortly after her husband Mossimo Giannulli was sentenced to five months in prison for his involvement in the college admissions scandal, Lori Loughlin found out her own fate: During a Zoom hearing, the Full House actress and mother was sentenced to two months in prison, according to the Associated Press.

The two paid $500,000 in order to get their daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose Giannulli, accepted to the University of Southern California as rowing team recruits. (The two no longer attend USC.) Back in May, Loughlin pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud while Giannulli pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and one count of honest services wire and mail fraud.

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On Friday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Justin O’Connell said Loughlin “was focused on getting what she wanted, no matter how and no matter the cost,” and that prison time was necessary to show that “everyone no matter your status is accountable in our justice system.”

While addressing the judge, Loughlin said: “I made an awful decision. I went along with a plan to give my daughters an unfair advantage in the college admissions process and in doing so I ignored my intuition and allowed myself to be swayed from my moral compass. I have great faith in God and I believe in redemption, and I will do everything in my power to redeem myself and use this experience as a catalyst to do good.”

In his own statement to the judge, Giannulli said: “I take full responsibility for my conduct. I am ready to accept the consequences and move forward, with the lessons I’ve learned from this experience.”

Both Loughlin and Giannulli took plea deals in the case and were sentenced more than a year after the news first broke about the scandal. In addition to prison time, Giannulli will pay a $250,000 fine and complete 250 hours of community service, while Loughlin will pay a $150,000 fine and complete 100 hours of service. The AP reports prosecutors said Giannulli deserved the harsher sentence because he was “the more active participant in the scheme.”

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